David Valley's Real Estate/Home Inspection Blog

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Maintaining Your Chimney

chimney maintenance

 

There are a wide variety of chimneys in Massachusetts, which represent an even wider variety of interrelated components that comprise them. However, there are three basic types of chimneys: single-walled metal chimneys, masonry chimneys and pre-fabricated metal chimneys that are commonly referred to as factory-built chimneys. Single-walled metal chimneys should not be confused with factory-built chimneys, and are rarely found in residential use, but masonry (lined and un-lined) and factory-built chimneys are a commonplace in Massachusetts.

My inspection of chimneys is that of a Generalist and not a Specialist, and meets all industry standards. However, significant areas of chimney flues cannot be adequately viewed during a field inspection, as has been documented by the Chimney Safety Institute of America, which reported in 1992: "The inner reaches of a flue are relatively inaccessible, and it should not be expected that the distant oblique view from the top or bottom is adequate to fully document damage even with a strong light." Therefore, because my inspection of chimneys is limited to those areas that can be viewed without dismantling any portion of them, and does not include the use of specialized equipment, I will not guarantee their integrity. I recommend that all chimneys be video-scanned for deterioration or missing liners (see picture below) before the close of escrow.

 

CHIMNEY FLUES

Chimney flues need to be cleaned periodically, to prevent the possibility of a chimney fire. However, the complex variety of deposits that form within the chimney flues (as a result of incomplete combustion), and which contribute to such fires, are complicated and not easily understood. They range from soot or pure carbon that simply does not burn, to creosote tars that can easily ignite. All of these deposits are commonly described as creosote, but creosote has many forms, ranging from crusty carbon deposits that can be easily brushed away, to tar-glazed creosote that requires a professional chemical cleaning. These deposits must be identified and treated by a chimney Specialist. However, cleaning a chimney is not a guarantee against a chimney fire. Studies have proven that a significant percentage of chimney fires have resulted within one month of the chimney being cleaned and many more have resulted within a six-month period.

It is impossible for Massachusetts Home Inspections to determine with any degree of certainty whether all flues are free of defects. In accordance with recommendations made by the National Fire Prevention Association, I recommend that all home Buyers have the chimneys inspected before purchasing their home. You should consider having a C S I A, or equivalently certified chimney sweep, conduct a Level II inspection of all chimney flues prior to close of escrow.

 

UNLINED CHIMNEY IN NEED OF AN APPROVED LINER

unlined chimney

 

Massachusetts Home Inspections

 

 

Comment balloon 10 commentsDavid Valley • October 16 2010 07:30AM

Comments

Hey David.  Good to see you! 

A little spalling here, a little there, and soon you have a real work of art.  I think you are being very picky...

;>)

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 10 years ago

Jay,

 

Ya think.

 

That's nothing, I found one yesterday that was literally pulling away from the house. The roof flashing and the cedar siding was being pulled with it. Nobody noticed it but me.

Posted by David Valley, Massachusetts Home Inspections (Massachusetts Home Inspections) over 10 years ago

David...Good tips and excellent advice to have the chimney inspected BEFORE closing on the property.  

Posted by Anita Clark, Realtor - Homes for Sale in Warner Robins GA (Coldwell Banker Access Realty ~ 478.960.8055) over 10 years ago

Thank you, Anita

Posted by David Valley, Massachusetts Home Inspections (Massachusetts Home Inspections) over 10 years ago

Hi David, great post and excellent photos, good advice for the home owner.

Posted by Dan Edward Phillips, Realtor and Broker/Owner (Dan Edward Phillips) over 10 years ago

Thank you, Dan. I've got many more images of chimney defects but they have to be uploaded to a website before I post them here on ActiveRain. I'd like it better if members had the oportunity to upload pics to ActiveRain.

Posted by David Valley, Massachusetts Home Inspections (Massachusetts Home Inspections) over 10 years ago

HA!  Once I pulled up to a house and the chimney had come off about 8" and leaned noticeably.  My clients asked me in the driveway about it!  That night the seller, drunk, called me, telling me that since I had gotten on the roof and pushed his chimney over, he was coming over to my house to push me over!  I told him to come on!  He didn't show...

I bet you do that all the time - get up there and push those suckers over, just to have something to report.

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 10 years ago

Ya Jay,

 

Don't we all just love to push on leaning chimneys.

Check this thread out....

FALLING CHIMNEY

Posted by David Valley, Massachusetts Home Inspections (Massachusetts Home Inspections) over 10 years ago

Again, HA!  That is one fine-looking homeowner job!  Secured, flashed, fitted right into place!  Is it still there?

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 10 years ago

Jay,

If you follow the thread, you'll see the end result. Chimney is now gone...

Posted by David Valley, Massachusetts Home Inspections (Massachusetts Home Inspections) over 10 years ago

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